• No COLA Expected For Next Year By Mary Johnson, editor The coronavirus is creating especially challenging long-term impacts for the nation’s retirees.  Coronavirus – caused deflation will likely obliterate the Social Security cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) for next year, at the same time causing Medicare Part B premiums to peak at new highs.  The combined impact could result in a similar situation to ...
  • Deflation Signals Zero COLA For 2021, Benefits Lose 30% Of Buying Power Social Security benefits have lost 30 percent of buying power since 2000.  These are the findings of an annual TSCL study that examines the adequacy of Social Security benefits in keeping up with the rising costs typically experienced by adults age 65 and up. This year’s study found a 3 percentage point gain in the buying ...
  • A Coronavirus Caused Recession Could Eliminate Next Year’s COLA Older Americans have the highest health risk from the coronavirus and now the coronavirus-caused economic recession, along with falling oil prices, put the next Social Security cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) in jeopardy.  The rate of growth in consumer price inflation was already slowing prior to the arrival of the coronavirus.  The cost of petroleum products plunged ...
  • Should Social Security Benefits be Adjusted Using a Locality-based Payment Rate? Mary Johnson, editor Should Social Security benefits be adjusted annually using a locality – based payment rate?  Some of you, particularly those of you who are retired federal employees know far more about locality – based pay adjustments than I do.  I hope you folks can set us straight on a new legislative proposal that would ...
  • Benefit Bulletin: January 2020 Your Survey Responses are Helping to Change Attitudes About Social Security By Rick Delaney, Chairman of the Board Over the past 25 years, Congress has periodically debated plans to fix Social Security’s financing, that rely heavily on benefit cuts.  But for the first time in 2019 and 2020, Congress is considering a plan to strengthen Social Security ...
  • This Really Happened — a 77% Social Security COLA! By Mary Johnson, editor Social Security beneficiaries are receiving a cost-of-living adjustment of just 1.6% this year.  For many, that won’t be enough to keep up with healthcare costs, let alone items like homeowners and auto insurance or rising real estate taxes.  That leaves retirees digging deeper into savings — if they have any, or — ...
  • Social Security Benefits Increase by Just 1.6% in 2020 Just as we forecast, the Social Security cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) for 2020 will be considerably lower than the 2.8 percent COLA received this year.  The Social Security Administration recently announced that the 2020 COLA will be 1.6 %.  That would raise an average retiree benefit of $1,460 by about $23.40 per month — far less ...
  • Social Security Benefits Estimated to Increase by 1.6% in 2020 By Mary Johnson, editor   The Social Security cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) for 2020 will be announced October 10th and, according to the latest consumer price index data, it’s likely to be considerably lower than the COLA received this year which raised benefits 2.8%.  The government’s consumer price index data indicates that inflation has fallen, and, that COLA ...
  • Social Security COLA Drops to 1.6 Percent For 2020 (Washington, DC)  The Social Security cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) for 2020 will be considerably lower than the 2.8 percent COLA received this year, according to a new estimate from The Senior Citizens League (TSCL).  “The government’s consumer price index data for August indicates that COLA recipients can expect to get a benefit boost of about 1.6 ...
  • Legislative Update: September 2019 What Could A COLA of No Less Than 3 Percent Mean For You?  By Shannon Benton, Executive Director The Social Security cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) is provided to protect the buying power of Social Security benefits from rising prices.  Yet for almost a decade, retirees have had to manage their household budgets despite COLAs that have been ...

Close