• How Using The Chained CPI To Calculate COLAs Would Affect Your Benefits The newly enacted tax legislation calls for adjusting tax brackets and the standard deduction using the more slowly growing Chained consumer price index (CPI).  What would switching to the new index for calculating Social Security benefits mean for retired and disabled beneficiaries? A new study released by The Senior Citizens League finds that the Chained CPI ...
  • Social Security COLAs Need to Double and Medicare Part B Increases Cut in Half, to Ensure Benefit Adequacy (Washington, DC) – Social Security cost-of-living adjustments (COLA) would need to double their rate of growth and Medicare Part B premium increases would need to slow by half their historic rate to provide greater Social Security benefit adequacy, says a new report  from The Senior Citizens League.  Using the federal government’s economic projections for the ...
  • How A Provision of Tax Reform Increases Chances of Lower COLAs By Mary Johnson, editor The main source of funding for Social Security comes from the payroll taxes that workers pay into the program.  But there are two other sources of revenues: taxes that retirees pay on their Social Security benefits, and the “interest” earned by the “I.O.U.s” held by the Social Security Trust Fund. The I.O.U.s in ...
  • Chained CPI Would Cut Average Social Security Benefits (Washington, DC) – Higher taxes — lower benefits — more complexity.  A new, more slowly growing consumer price index (CPI), known as the chained CPI, promises the worst of all worlds for tens of millions retirees, disabled and other Americans with the lowest incomes, according to a new report from The Senior Citizens League.  “It’s ...
  • Why We Need A Better COLA Social Security recipients will get 2% cost-of-living (COLA) adjustment effective January 2018.  But despite it being the largest increase in five years, the news is being met with frustration from millions of retiree households who won’t see any of the raise, primarily due to rising Medicare Part B costs. For people with incomes less than $85,000, ...
  • Social Security Announces 2% COLA Social Security recipients will receive the highest cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) in 5 years, effective January 1st. The Social Security Administration recently announced a COLA of 2%. While the boost is critically needed for almost 61.5 million beneficiaries to maintain their purchasing power, the 2% COLA extends a disturbing 8-year pattern of low COLAs that have been far ...
  • 2018 Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA) Announced (Washington, DC) – The Social Security Administration has announced that the annual cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) will increase benefits by 2.0 percent for 2018. While the increase is the highest in five years, it won’t be enough to offset dramatically higher Medicare Part B premium increases for millions of beneficiaries, warns The Senior Citizens League. “For the third year ...
  • Social Security Benefits Lose 30% of Buying Power Since 2000 (Washington, DC) – Social Security beneficiaries have lost nearly one – third of their buying power since 2000, according to the 2017 Social Security Loss of Buying Power Study by The Senior Citizens League (TSCL).  The findings represent a big loss of 7 percent in buying power, from 23% in 2016 to 30% over the ...
  • 2018 Cost of Living (COLA) Projection (Washington, DC) – Social Security recipients can look forward to receiving an annual cost – of – living adjustment (COLA) of about 1.8 percent in 2018, according to an estimate released today by The Senior Citizens League (TSCL).  “A COLA of that amount would make it the highest since 2012 — but even at 1.8 ...
  • Benefit Bulletin: September/October 2017 What Your Member Of Congress Might Try To Tell You About The COLA Don’t be surprised if you hear your Member of Congress say that the Social Security cost–of–living adjustment (COLA) is too high — and that you are overpaid. Even though the COLA has only averaged 1% in recent years, your COLA could become ...

Close